Serving Victims of Crime

Schedule and Workshop Details: 25th Annual Two Days in June Conference

Click on presenter names for more details.

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

MORNING KEYNOTE SPEAKER

  7:00 am - 8:00 am

Networking Breakfast

  8:00 am - 9:15 am

Keynote Speaker - Grand Ballroom
Victor Vieth, JD - An Awesome Opportunity - The National Plan to End Violence

In this inspirational yet practical keynote presentation, participants will learn of a national plan to significantly reduce violence. The plan contains dozens of concrete recommendations which communities can implement quickly and that are supported by research. The plan also includes a framework for expanding prevention initiatives at the local level.

  9:30 am - 10:45 am

Keynote Speaker - Grand Ballroom
Casey Gwinn, JD - The Power of Hope in Lives of Survivors

Hope is the most predictive measurement of well-being in survivors of violence, trauma, and abuse. Casey Gwinn believes we can and should measure hope in all our programs and design our intervention and prevention work to focus on creating a community of hope for survivors (adults and children) long after the crisis. He will share the national research on trauma-informed, hope-centered work and challenge everyone to focus on survivor-defined goal attainment in our work. Casey will also talk about the trend toward collaborative approaches that increase multi-disciplinary and multi-agency work in increasing victim safety and offender accountability.

  11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Keynote Speakers - Grand Ballroom
Chief Jerald Monahan & Varsha N., JD - Bystander Intervention - Understanding the Dynamics, Power and Impact of Intervening

The inaction of individuals who witness, or are in close proximity to criminal acts of violence, has been a source of concern for criminal justice professionals and other in the community for many years. With most mobile phones now having quality video capabilities, it is common for someone to film a criminal act, including one that harms another person, without taking any physical action to stop or prevent the activity. In some cases where a bystander does intervene, the intervention may or may not be appropriate or produces the safety needed by the victim being harmed.

Albert Einstein once stated, "The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing." This presentation will cover, through actual and simulated case and scenario reviews, how and when bystanders may be able to make a situation safer for the victim involved as well as maintaining their own safety. Strategies for intervening will be brought out and discussed as well as recognition of the actual need to intervene. Recognition of the actions being witnessed are key to understanding when to intervene and when not to. The intersection between aggression and threatening behavior and bizarre, unusual behavior from someone having a mental health crisis will be explored and the impact of both on bystander's reaction.

The psychology of bystander action and inaction will be presented with information from various research studies brought out to emphasis points made during the discussion. How social media has impacted bystander action or inaction will be discussed and examples of the current trend will offer as a way of showing how we as a society, or a culture, are changing in a positive way.

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

 

  12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch in Grand Ballroom provided by ICDVVA

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

EARLY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Criminality V. Substance Abuse Disorders: Intervention Strategies, Kim Keys, LCPC, NCC, QSUDP, CCS

Often, substance disordered individuals and criminogenic thinkers are misunderstood as being the same. While these two disorders can be co-morbid they often are not. It is important that justice and behavioral health professionals, respectively, have knowledge to differentiate between the two disorders to better inform treatment, orders, sentencing and supervision. This common understanding for treatment and criminal justice systems are crucial to increasing successes for individuals and reducing recidivism. This training with provide the tools necessary to better identify criminogenic thinkers and substance disordered individuals. It will outline best practices for treatment as well as supervision and provide an opportunity to discuss, in group forum, solutions to our current system.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Offender Accountability - A Systems Perspective, James E Henderson, MSW

This workshop will discuss the many factors involved in holding the domestic violence offender accountable for their behavior and how our policies and practices can enhance or impede both victim safety and offender accountability. Participants will learn the concept of Therapeutic Jurisprudences and the importance of a victim centered approach. We discuss the similarities and differences between partner abuse and substance abuse; new tools for managing offenders and how enhanced collaboration with all community partners, through assessments and monitoring ultimately lead to community safety. The presenter will identify national resources for the management of those charged with domestic violence.

Training/Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how the system and you enhances or impedes victim safety & offender accountability.
  • Identify the similarities & differences between partner abuse and substance abuse.
  • Identify new tools for managing offenders.
  • Identify national resources for the management of those charged with DV.
  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Understanding & Responding to Sexual Behaviors in Children, Victor Vieth, JD

This workshop details normal and abnormal sexual behaviors of youth and offers concrete recommendations for treatment and other services for children with sexual behavior problems.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Effective Handling of Near and Non-Fatal Strangulation Cases, Casey Gwinn, JD

Men who strangle women are the most dangerous men on the planet. Most professionals in the domestic violence and sexual assault movements have missed the lethal significance and importance of these cases for years. Many survivors experience long-term physical consequences and the advocacy, mental health, and medical communities don't understand the significance of their injuries. Police officers, prosecutors, advocates, doctors, nurses, and mental health professionals will benefit from this short workshop summarizing the key issues in the effective short and long-term handling of strangulation assaults. Casey Gwinn co-founded the Training Institute on Strangulation Prevention with Gael Strack and he will present the latest findings in their research along with best practices for all professionals.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

The Absent Witness, Avoiding & Overcoming Confrontation Challenges, Teresa Garvey, JD

Survivors of intimate partner and sexual violence are often unable to participate in the criminal justice process, often due to the defendant's intimidation and manipulation. Prosecutors in these cases must be prepared for the possibility that when the case goes to trial, the victim may be absent. This workshop will assist prosecutors and allied professionals in understanding the legal requirements for introducing the out-of-court statements of a non-testifying witness, emphasizing the importance of identifying and documenting the victim's non-testifying witness, emphasizing the importance of identifying and documenting the victim's non-testimonial statements, preserving the victim's testimony at a proceeding that affords an opportunity for cross-examination, establishing grounds for forfeiture by wrongdoing, and arguing the admissibility of the victim's out-of-court statements.

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

 

  3:00 pm - 3:15 pm

Afternoon Break

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

LATE AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

When Words Hurt: Investigating/Prosecuting Cases of Emotional Maltreatment, Victor Vieth, JD

Students will receive an overview of the literature concerning the emotional abuse of and child and will receive concrete suggestions for investigating these cases and for proving an allegation of emotional abuse in either a civil child protection or criminal case.

This training will demonstrate the methods of attainment (including the Dark Web and how Bit Coin comes into play), the signs and symptoms of influence, and many type of paraphernalia being used. Pictures of drug paraphernalia will also be displayed so attendees can understand all the ways abusers are ingesting, smoking, injecting, and even snorting drugs. For example, prescription pills and meth are now being mixed with glycerin and smoked in a vape pen. Not only are prescription drugs being abused, but new designer drugs are flooding American streets on a weekly basis. Humor and entertaining stories are also incorporated to keep the attendee attentive. This comprehensive training covers everything from Ativan to Zohydro.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Making It Stick, Protecting the Record for Appeal, Teresa Garvey, JD

Obtaining a conviction in a sexual assault or domestic violence case is usually a hard-won victory, whether by guilty plea or by trial. Though the appellate process is unavoidable, a prosecutor can bring a measure of finality to the criminal just process by carefully building a strong and favorable trial court record that supports the conviction and the sentence imposed and withstands challenge on appeal. This workshop will discuss the proper creation and protection of the record during all phases of a criminal case, focusing on directing the investigation to maximize admissible evidence at trial, strategic charging that will minimize evidentiary obstacles, pretrial motions, and briefing to ensure the court makes the correct rulings on the record, avoiding prosecutorial misconduct in summation, seeking appropriate jury instructions, and placing essential facts on the record at the time of please and sentencing.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Working With and Enhancing the Safety of Those Victimized by Violence Through Victim Centered Interviewing, James E Henderson, MSW

This workshop will discuss the many factors involved in holding the domestic violence offender accountable for their behavior and to enhance victim satisfaction with the criminal justice system. Among the topics that will be discussed are: working with and interviewing victims of violence; identifying how the system enhances or impedes one's ability to manage trauma; utilizing methods of communicating with those victimized by violence that are safe and productive; trauma informed and empowerment based questions; incorporating community partners in the autonomy of victims and identifying ways to safely and legally releasing information that enhance safety and accountability.

Training/Learning Objectives:

  • Identify how the system enhances or impedes one's ability to manage Trauma
  • Identify ways to enhance victim satisfaction with the criminal justice system
  • Identify palatable ways of communicating with those victimized by violence that are safe and productive
  • Identify ways of incorporating community partners in the management of offenders and the autonomy of victims
  • Identify ways to safely and legally releasing information that enhance safety and accountability
  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

The Dynamics of Opioids, Officer Ryan Buzzini

This training covers one of the fastest growing drug trends in America – Opioid abuse. With the ever-changing atmosphere in today's culture, it is imperative to keep track of all prescription and non-prescription medicines that not only children, but adults are using, to get high.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Trauma Informed Care & Response, Myra Ferechil

This presentation is essential. "Trauma Informed Care" have become buzz words, but it is such a complicated and difficult concept. In this presentation, I paint a picture of how many different shifts and changes are necessary in order to "actually" become Trauma Informed. I include practical and tangible things they can do on a platform of neuroscience and biology.

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

MORNING WORKSHOPS

  7:00 am - 8:00 am

Continental Breakfast

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Identifying & Supervising Victims of Intimate Partner Violence, James E Henderson, MSW

Domestic violence cuts across all boundaries of race, age, social class and even sexual orientation, impacting the lives of individuals from all social categories—including those involved with the criminal justice system. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that the victim and probation/parole populations are not mutually exclusive populations. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, between 40 and 57 percent of women offenders in prison, jail or on probation supervision reported experiencing physical or sexual abuse prior to their sentence. Of those women, approximately half reported that their abusers were intimate partners. Increasingly, community corrections agencies and professionals are addressing intimate partner violence through enhanced—in some cases, specialized—supervision of intimate partner abusers. These efforts have been critical to enhancing the criminal justice response to domestic violence and have demonstrated the critical role that community corrections should play in addressing intimate partner violence. However, probation, parole, and pretrial services professionals can also play an important role in identifying and addressing the needs of victims of intimate partner violence under community supervision. In addition, due to the nature of the work that community corrections officers do and the access that they have to the homes and lives of the individuals they supervise, they are also in a unique situation to recognize potential unreported cases of IPV.

Training/Learning Objectives:

  • Identify risk factors that may provide insight into whether an individual is experiencing IPV.
  • List sample screening questions and assessment tools that supervision officers can use to screen for IPV.
  • Identify collateral contacts and other data that may be useful sources of information when seeking to identify IPV victims.
  • Identify supervision strategies that officers can use to help protect the safety and address risk/needs of individuals on supervision who are victims of IPV.
  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Realize, Recognize & Respond-Human Trafficking in the United States, Anna Brewer

By using anecdotes and science, this course will educate the audience to "Realize" that Sex Trafficking happens throughout the United States - EVEN IN IDAHO, teach the audience to "Recognize" the signs of sex trafficking and offer a venue through which to "Respond."

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Civil Meets Criminal: Coordinating Our Response, Teresa Garvey, JD

A coordinated response to intimate partner violence provides maximum support to the victims of such crimes. Over the years, prosecutors have learned the value of the collaboration with law enforcement, advocates, and other allied professional in the interest of promoting victim safety and offender accountability. However, the victim's civil attorney can be a sometimes-overlooked collaborator. This workshop will suggest ways in which prosecutors and civil practitioners can better understand each other's roles and advance their common interest in the victim's safety and well-being during the course of criminal proceedings and any related civil proceedings. Appropriate information sharing, with the victim-client's consent, may help to identify unreported criminal offenses, valuable evidence that may corroborate (or substitutes for) the victim's in-court testimony, and admissions or valuable investigative leads disclosed in discovery, as well as victim concerns regarding appropriate disposition (such as no-contact conditions, restitution, or substance abuse treatment).

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Responding to Serious Mental Illness, Julie Ann Rivers-Cochran, MSW

Coming Soon

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Active Shooters: Warning Signs and Response Planning, Tom Veivia, JD

Coming Soon

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

MORNING BREAK

  10:00 am - 10:15 pm

Break

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

LATE MORNING WORKSHOPS

  10:15 am - 11:45 am

Justice Involved Women: Addiction and Domestic Violence, James E. Henderson, MSW

Coming Soon

  10:15 am - 11:45 am

Intersectional Approach to Understanding Violence in the US, Myra Ferechil

This one is interesting and a passion to me. On one hand I am pushing the intersectional approach with people who are working in a one dimensionally, i.e.: Gender and Violence. We cannot talk about gender without talking about race, class, ability, nation status… so forth. On the other hand- we have "call out culture". There is less patience for a learning curve and not a lot of room for "meeting people where they are at". There is a huge emphasis on self-education and a lot of folks are frustrated

I like to encourage space to learn. We have to both, meet people where they are at, but also dedicate ourselves to lifelong learning. What is the end goal? To me it is create services that are intersectional- that means we have to meet people in their learning process and people have to be open to learning.

  10:15 am - 11:45 am

Resilience After Working Child Victim Crimes & Mass Casualties, Tom Veivia, JD

Law enforcement officers are exposed to higher number of traumatic incidents than the general population. Research on the effects of trauma and continually evolving and exposure to these finding will serve to inoculate law enforcement to the sometimes devastating effects on one's quality of life and their personal and professional relationships. This presentation provides a first-person perspective from a veteran agent who was a tactical first responder to the Sandy Hook mass casualty event and its aftermath. An overview on trauma, to include the physiological and emotional effects on brain and body are outlined in this presentation using examples in an effort to normalize the law enforcement officer's experience. Information will be provided on how to manage the long-term effects of trauma and most importantly when to seek help.

  10:15 am - 11:45 am

The Power of Advocacy within Law Enforcement: Challenges, Successes, and the Impact on Systems, Varsha N., JD & Chief Jerald Monahan

The workshop will examine the history of the relationship between victim advocacy and law enforcement, while recognizing the similarities and differences in philosophy, and identify the evolution of this relationship as it shifts from a mentality as adversaries, to one of collaborative partnership. This workshop will use examples from across the nation that highlight the importance of this systemic change and recognize the challenges associated with victim advocates serving in police agencies as police employees. There will be discussion and identification of the unique differences between systems based advocacy and community-based advocacy.

Focus will be brought forth to identify best practices used that have contributed to successful partnerships and ways this cutting edge model can increase services for victims and effective investigations for officers. By enhancing this type of response to victims of domestic and sexual violence, law enforcement and advocacy services will increase their efficiency, effectiveness, and create opportunities to meet the unique needs of victims. When law enforcement agencies house advocacy services internally, the systemic response to violence can be addressed from a dynamic multi-disciplinary approach.

Objectives

As a result of this workshop, participants will be better able to:

  1. Understand the history of the victim advocacy movement and its interaction with law enforcement over the last 25 years.
  2. Analyze the advocate's role as a voice for victims and an aid to criminal investigations.
  3. Apply strategies grounded in evidence-based research for overcoming obstacles as victim advocates are employed and working with police agencies.
  4. Understand how the duties and responsibilities of law enforcement can be complimented by the duties and responsibilities of victim advocates.
  10:15 am - 11:45 am

Idaho Domestic Violence Supplement Predict Liability, Monica Morrison, JD

During the session, there will be an examination of recent Idaho domestic violence homicides and the risk factors present in those cases prior to the homicides.

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

LUNCH BREAK

  11:45 am - 1:30 pm

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

EARLY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

New Rule 33, Amber Moe, L.C.P.C.

Idaho Court Rules for Domestic Violence Evaluators: New revisions effective July 1, 2018.

This workshop will provide an overview of the changes to Idaho Criminal Rule 33.3 - Evaluation of Persons Guilty of Domestic Assault or Domestic Battery and Idaho Court Administrative Rule 75 - Domestic Violence Evaluators; Advisory Board. These changes, effective July 1, 2018, will impact the scope of the domestic violence evaluation report and the qualification and education for evaluators. Presenters will also discuss the approved tools for domestic violence evaluations, accessing national criminal history background information, victim interviewing techniques, and report distribution.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Manipulating the Mentally Ill in Domestic Violence, Julie Ann Rivers-Cochran, MSW

Coming Soon

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Investigating Human Trafficking, Anna Brewer

This course is for law enforcement officers and prosecutors and is designed to walk step by step through identifying the crime problem, establishing a multidisciplinary approach, creating and ensuring policies are in place, and detailing the collection of evidence to successfully investigate sex trafficking. This course will focus on the internet and undercover operations that accompany these investigations but will also offer examples of other businesses that may engage in sex trafficking.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Finding Our Groove, Through the Right Moves - An Exploration of Healing Modalities from Around the World, Chief Jerald Monahan & Varsha N., JD

Coming Soon

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Vicarious Trauma Prevention, Myra Ferechil

Vicarious Trauma leads to burnt out services. Clients feel the impact of burnt out staff in such a terrible way. Unfortunately in this field we have the "model victim" and the "difficult victim". Let's face facts- it is easy to serve the victim who has a safety net, mental health, is full of gratitude and practices good hygiene. BUT the victims have complicated lives with compounded lifelong trauma and hard to work with- burnt out staff will and do push them on to the next service provider. There are a lot of tangle things an agency can do to ensure their staff is healthy and practicing self-care.

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

Conference Ends at 3:00 pm