Serving Victims of Crime

Schedule and Workshop Details: 23rd Annual Two Days in June Conference

Click on presenter names for more details.

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

MORNING KEYNOTE SPEAKER

  7:30 am - 8:00 am

Registration / Check-in

  8:00 am - 8:15 am

Welcome - Idaho Council on Domestic Violence and Victim Assistance

  8:15 am - 10:00 am

Keynote Speaker - Grand Ballroom
Keynote Address: Keeping Children Safe Without Holding Mothers Responsible for "Failure to Protect" presented by David Mandel, MA, LPC

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

  10:00 am - 10:15 am

Break

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Keynote Speaker - Grand Ballroom
Stress and Trauma in Crisis presented by Matt Logan, Ph.D., RCMP (Retired)

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

 

  12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Lunch in Grand Ballroom provided by ICDVVA

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

EARLY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Inside the Mind of the Predator Part 1, Matt Logan, Ph.D., RCMP (Retired)

This seminar not only illuminates the mindset of the predator but also reveals how the police or corrections officer can use counter-intuitive strategies to gain insight on this type of offender. Relational skills along with forensic insight are emphasized in this seminar that includes videotaped interviews with offenders.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Perpetrators as Parents: How Setting High Expectations for Men as Fathers Helps Men, Women and Children, David Mandel, MA, LPC

Cultural double standards for men and women as parents harm men, women and children. When domestic violence is involved, perpetrators can gain significant benefits in courts and other systems that ignore the relationship between his choices and negative outcomes for child and family functioning. In this workshop, David will discuss how to examine the impact of gendered parenting expectations on programs and community collaboration and how setting higher expectations for men as parents can improve outcomes for families.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Safety Planning and Boundary Setting in Family and School Settings, Erin Taylor, Ph.D., Sharon "Shel" Millington, M.A.

This presentation will focus on providing recommendations around safety planning for youth with PSB. Particular attention will be focused on discussing safety planning for families, as well as how to engage with and implement safety plans in schools.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Domestic Violence and the Other Victims, Sgt. Jim Sears (Retired)

A look inside Domestic Violence and the other victims... the children. What to look for and strategies to help those innocent victims.

  1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Understanding and Addressing the Overlapping Issues: Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault Mental Health, Trauma & Addictions, Julie Owens

Victims often have experienced both domestic violence and sexual assault. Survivors of both of these crimes often suffer trauma reactions such as depression, anxiety and PTSD. Some survivors have mental health concerns or addictions prior to their abuse, while others develop them as a result. Many turn to addictive substances as a way to cope with abuse or traumatic memories. Best practices requires competency when assisting victims with complex multiple vulnerabilities. This session will discuss these overlapping concerns and ways of addressing them non-judgmentally, in partnership with victims and survivors.

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

 

  3:00 pm - 3:15 pm

Afternoon Break

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 2

LATE AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Inside the Mind of the Predator Part 2, Matt Logan, Ph.D., RCMP (Retired)

Continued after the Break. This seminar not only illuminates the mindset of the predator but also reveals how the police or corrections officer can use counter-intuitive strategies to gain insight on this type of offender. Relational skills along with forensic insight are emphasized in this seminar that includes videotaped interviews with offenders.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Creating Child-centered Partnerships with Adult Domestic Violence Survivors , David Mandel, MA, LPC

A strength-based child centered approach to partnering with domestic violence survivors starts with seeing the perpetrator's actions as the sole source of domestic violence related child risk and safety concerns. Building on this foundation, this workshop will explore strategies for building strong partnerships with domestic violence survivors around the safety and well being of their children. Validation of strengths and other techniques will be discussed.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Best Practices in Responding to Child Abuse Cases; The Child Advocacy Center Model, Kathy Downes, LCPC, MCoun, INCAC Director

More than 9,000 cases of child abuse are investigated annually in Idaho. Last year 2,249 children were forensically interviewed at Child Advocacy Centers in Idaho for suspected abuse issues including: child sexual abuse, witness to crime/murder, physical abuse, drug environments and other abuse issues. This training will address best practices when dealing with these abuse cases, from reporting to investigation to follow up treatment.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Trafficking: The Hidden Secret, Sgt. Jim Sears (Retired)

Looking at what is going on in human trafficking and strategies for local law enforcement and advocates to be ready for.

  3:15 pm - 5:00 pm

Start by Believing Public Awareness Campaign: Changing Our Responses to Sexual Assault Victims, One Reaction at a Time, Chief Jerald Monahan, Varsha N., JD

Start by Believing is a public awareness campaign focused on the public response to sexual assault, because the first person a victim confides in after an assault is typically a friend or family member. How they react determines in large part what happens next. When friends, family members, and professionals do not respond appropriately, their negative reactions will only worsen the victim's trauma and decrease the likelihood that the victim will access community services and report the assault to the police. On the other hand, a positive reaction will not only improve their health and well-being, but also increase the chance the victims will reach out for help from other sources. The two positive behaviors that stand out for victims are having someone to talk to and being believed.

Positive support is particularly critical for victims to become engaged – and remain engaged – in the criminal justice system. It may be the only way to decrease the percentage of sexual assault cases where victims "decline prosecution" and withdraw from participating in the investigation of their case. Moreover, because rapists attack an average of six times, one failed response can equal five more victims. The Start by Believing campaign was created to stop this cycle, by creating a positive community response to sexual assault, both to improve outcomes for victims and to hold more offenders accountable for their crimes. Preliminary evidence suggests that the campaign increases reporting and other forms of help-seeking among sexual assault victims.

This workshop is designed to explain how you can launch a campaign in your own community, and document the impact on a variety of outcomes. Campaigns can utilize a variety of different strategies, both big and small, but they require consistent leadership from the top of the organization. A campaign can include disseminating brochures and other written materials, promoting media coverage, posting campaign materials on the department's website, spreading the word through social media channels, including it in training, and ensuring that the message remains front and center by emphasizing it at every possible opportunity: "In our police department, our prosecutor's office, and our community – we Start by Believing."

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be better able to:

  • Review research on the impact of positive versus negative reactions to disclosures, from informal support people as well as responding professionals.
  • Discuss the purpose of the Start by Believing public awareness campaign, and examine materials that are available to help professionals launch their own local initiative.
  • Examine preliminary evidence for the impact of a campaign on various measures, including the public's understanding and response to the campaign, the number of sexual assault reports made to police, and the number of calls to the local rape crisis center.
 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

MORNING WORKSHOPS

  8:30 am - 10:00 am
Extracting Information: Interviewing 201 Part 1, Matt Logan, Ph.D., RCMP (Retired)

This seminar is essential for those working in the criminal justice system who are tasked with assessment, supervision, treatment, and investigation of offenders.  This seminar will also benefit mental health experts and prosecutors who must get through the smokescreen and extract the truth in assessments and examinations.

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

The Dilemma of Christian Battered Women: When Prayer isn't Enough, Julie Owens

One of the places domestic violence victims may be potentially identified, assessed and assisted is in their faith communities. However, clergy and faith leaders are often untrained in domestic violence and victims seeking help find that their safety and confidentiality concerns are not understood. Frequently victims are told that their suffering is redemptive (their "cross to bear"), that wives must submit to husbands, that divorce is not allowed and that they must forgive the abuser. When this happens victims may sometimes be forced to choose between their safety and their faith. This session will discuss the various scriptural and spiritual challenges faced by Christian victims and how helpers can address them.

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Defining Problematic Sexual Behavior, Erin Taylor, Ph.D., Sharon "Shel" Millington, M.A.

Children with sexual behavior problems are a heterogeneous group. This presentation will focus on identifying normative and problematic sexual behaviors in youth. Origins of sexual behavior problems will be discussed.

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Crime Victims Compensation – Financial Assistance for Victims of Crime, Kristi Abel and Karen Putzier

This two part workshop will provide an overview of the Crime Victim Compensation Program in an interactive, informative format. Participants will learn about eligibility requirements, available benefits, accessing benefits, and sexual assault examination reimbursement protocols. During the second part of this workshop, program staff will hold focus groups to discuss issues specific to 1. Completing applications and Documentation, 2. Sexual assault examinations, 3. Provider/payment requirements and Claims and 4. Restitution and collections. Participants are encouraged to take advantage of multiple focus groups to get all their questions answered.

  8:30 am - 10:00 am

Sheltering Animals & Families Together (SAF-T)™: An Innovative Solution for Families and Pets in Crisis, Allie Phillips, JD

Research studies have clearly documented the linkage between animal abuse and domestic violence. However, if a domestic violence shelter is not making accommodations for families with pets, then they are unable to safeguard a majority of families in need. With over 68% of American households having family pets, and up to 48% of women refusing or delaying leaving an abusive home out of concern for their pet, Sheltering Animals & Families Together (SAF-T)™ is the solution. Created by Allie Phillips when she was a frontline prosecuting attorney, SAF-T is the first and only global initiative guiding domestic violence shelters on how to house pets on-site with families. SAF-T recognizes the linkages between violence to people and animals, how pets can be victims of domestic violence and can become targets of batterers. SAF-T also celebrates the human-animal bond by encouraging pets to remain with their family that can reduce trauma and provide therapeutic love and comfort. With approximately 100 participating shelters in 40 states, including Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, SAF-T allows families to leave an abusive home sooner if allowed to bring their pet with them, and prevents families from being lured back to the home to protect their pet.

This workshop will discuss the research regarding the linkages between animal abuse and domestic violence, and discuss practical tips on establishing SAF-T, procedures and policies, funding, advertising, veterinary case, legal issues, and will share successful stories from SAF-T shelters. For more information, please visit www.animalsandfamilies.net.

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

MORNING BREAK

  10:00 am - 10:15 pm

Break

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

LATE MORNING WORKSHOPS

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Extracting Information: Interviewing 201 Part 2, Matt Logan, Ph.D., RCMP (Retired)

Continued after the Break. This seminar is essential for those working in the criminal justice system who are tasked with assessment, supervision, treatment, and investigation of offenders.  This seminar will also benefit mental health experts and prosecutors who must get through the smokescreen and extract the truth in assessments and examinations.

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

DV 101.2: The Basics and Beyond, Julie Owens

The basics of domestic violence will discussed, along with more advanced concepts. Following an overview of domestic violence relationship dynamics and common misconceptions will be an in-depth look at victims and abusers. Included will be: how to distinguish between a true victim and an abuser who is claiming to be the victim, why abusers have difficulty changing, traumatic bonding, how victims are impacted by abuse (survival behaviors), do's and don'ts with victims and the importance of avoiding a rescue mentality.

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Victimless Prosecution, Monica Morrison, JD

This presentation focuses on how victimless prosecution is utilized in the prosecution of domestic violence cases. The presenter will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of employing victimless prosecution, the role of victims in a victimless prosecution strategy, how to transition to victimless prosecution, and the role of law enforcement in victimless prosecution.

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Ok...You got this case...Now what...?, Sgt. Jim Sears (Retired)

This is a look at sexual assault starting with societal perceptions into having to work a case and overcoming the obstacles that are inherent in sexual assault cases.

  10:15 am - 12:00 pm

Therapy Animals Helping Maltreated Children: Strategies for Successful Implementation in Child Advocacy Centers, Prosecutor's Offices and Courtrooms, Allie Phillips, JD

When a child has been maltreated, self-disclosing with an adult about the experience can be difficult and testifying in court can be traumatic. When trained therapy animals are incorporated into the process, children feel safe and more comfortable to speak about their experiences. The concept of therapy animals helping maltreated children is growing, but not all programs are the same and specific guidelines are needed for the safety of the children, therapy animal and staff. Ms. Phillips is the co-creator of Therapy Animals Supporting Kids (TASK)™ Program and will discuss how to work with volunteer handler/animal therapy teams, including mitigating risk and ensuring that no one, including the animal, is compromised. This workshop will discuss incorporating therapy animals as greeters at child advocacy centers, police stations, prosecutor's offices and court houses; during the forensic interview, medical/SANE examination, group/individual therapy, court preparation; and during courtroom testimony. The benefits and disadvantages of particular situations will be explored, including a detailed list of the do's and don'ts in each setting. Specific examples of how children's advocacy centers with successful programs will be featured. Legal objections and suggested responses will also be presented.

Objectives:

  1. Understanding the benefits and drawbacks of incorporating therapy animals with maltreated children, including the difference between therapy animals, service animals, and assistance animals.
  2. Understanding the dos and don'ts of placing therapy animals as greeters, forensic interviews, medical examinations, therapy, court preparation and courtroom testimony.
  3. Understanding the legal objections to incorporating therapy animals with maltreated children.
 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

LUNCH BREAK

  12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

LUNCH ON YOUR OWN

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

EARLY AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

  1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Predominant Aggressor and Victim Trauma, Chief Jerald Monahan, Varsha N., JD

The primary audience for this presentation is law enforcement, probation, prosecutors and the courts.  Advocates, health care professionals, and other stakeholders will benefit from understanding how law enforcement goes about to identify and document predominant aggressor and the signs of trauma they witness at the scene of a domestic violence incident.  Discussion about why victims behave in certain ways and the need for accurately interpreting and documenting that behavior will be held.  The importance of the first responders involvement and how that response may affect the ability of others to intervene will be brought out.

Included in this presentation will be an emphasis on the importance of proper recording of information in a police report.  Who uses police reports besides the criminal justice system will be pointed out and the difference between judgmental language and descriptive language will also be discussed.

Determining predominant aggressor is a solution to improper dual arrests.  Information about probable cause as the standard for an arrest; interpretation of self-defense laws; allowing injuries to tell part of the story; and coercive control behaviors will be presented.  In addition, discussion about individual world views and perceptions and how they shape opinions and beliefs will take place to showcase how each responder must investigate these cases from the involved parties experience and viewpoint.

Issues about the availability of existing resources and how predominant aggressor determination is a good resources management strategy.  How safety planning and orders of protection fit into predominant aggressor determinations, as well as lethality assessment and the findings and experience of the domestic violence fatality review teams that exist around the nation.

  1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Workplace Safety Training, Sgt. Jason Cantrell

This presentation focuses on workplace safety and awareness for all individuals working with the public that could become hostile or angry, especially those not normally in a job function as a "trained observer." It summarizes key elements of emergency preparedness and response: establishing emergency plans, training workers on the plan, and engaging in organized response operations.

  1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Evidence Based Interventions for Youth with Problematic and Illegal Sexual Behavior, Erin Taylor, Ph.D., Sharon "Shel" Millington, M.A.

This presentation will focus on evidence based interventions for youth with PSB, including discussions of the most important treatment components.

  1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Accident or Inflicted...Investigator, you decide!!!, Sgt. Jim Sears (Retired)

This is a look at physical abuse and societal perceptions of abuse and then moves into looking at different forms of injuries between accidental or inflicted and we will work with class to help determine which is which.

  1:30 pm - 3:30 pm

The Danger of When Animal Abuse Co-Occurs with Family Violence: Strategies and Policies for Keeping Families Safe, Allie Phillips, JD

When children witness harm to their companion animal, it can forever impact the health and wellbeing of the child and could lead to subsequent perpetration of harm towards animals and people. Over 82 million American homes (68%) have a companion animal with 98% deeming them a part of the family. This is particularly true for children who often see their pets as siblings. The American family has been redefined to include companion animals and how we respond to child abuse must now include inquiries about animals. When family violence is present, the pet is often targeted to gain silence and compliance of child victims. This session is important for anyone who speaks with children about abuse and provides for early-intervention to prevent the escalation of violence. This workshop will delve into the newest research and theories addressing how animals can be caught in the cross fire of family violence and how failing to address animal abuse can contribute to continued violence in the home. Strategies for intervention will include: the psychological impact of animal abuse on children; addressing when maltreated children turn to abusing animals; successful multi-disciplinary team responses; how to talk with children about their experiences with animals; and programs to assist families with companion animals flee abusive homes and find safety. Investigation and prosecution of crimes that link animal abuse to child abuse will be discussed.

Objectives:

  1. Understand the growing body of research that details the harmful effects of children witnessing animal abuse in the home.
  2. Learn how to talk to children about animals and animal abuse for better intervention and advocacy for the child.
  3. Learn about agency policy changes that recognize family pets and that can more effectively help children and families be safe.
 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3

Conference Ends at 3:30 pm